Should I Move After Suffering A Loss?

The death of a loved one is one of the most difficult events in anyone’s life. Unfortunately, all of us will experience loss and grief at some point. But, when you are suffering the loss of someone close to you, such as a spouse, parent, or child, grief may linger for years. Sometimes, you have to make a lifestyle change to effectively hit the reset button so that you can move on. Today’s ChipChop blog touches on the serious issue of why moving makes sense after loss and how to navigate the tedious process with your emotions intact. 

Benefits Of Fresh Scenery

Moving has many benefits. Specific to when you’ve lost a close loved one, changing homes or even hometowns can give your a fresh start. You can find a new job and create a new friend circle, which will keep you away from the daily reminders of what you’ve lost. Further, as 1Movers explains, making a long-distance move can give you a psychological breakpoint that helps you reflect on your life.

There are plenty of practical reasons that moving makes sense as well. If you are living on a two-person income and now you’re down to one, buying or renting a smaller home or apartment can help you maintain your budget. This may be especially important if you must deplete your savings to pay for a burial, which TruStage Insurance explains can cost more than $9000. You may also wish to move to be closer to family and friends who can support you in your grief and subsequent recovery.

Making Your Move

It’s not necessarily a good idea to move at first unless it’s unavoidable. But, once you know that relocation is on the horizon, you can start to prepare. One of the first things you’ll need to do is decide on what to do with your current home. If you plan to sell, make sure that you have a copy of all of your important documents, including property tax, the deed, and any information pertaining to your mortgage. Redfin also suggests having easement agreements and your HOA documents handy.

Next comes the hard part: sorting your and their personal belongings. This is one of the more emotional aspects of moving. After all, you will probably feel guilty about getting rid of their stuff, but you also may not have the space for everything. Another reason to let go of certain items is that it will help you come to terms with and accept your loss. Talk with your friends and family, and bequeath important or valuable personal items as appropriate. You can also donate or have an estate sale, which can include household items, appliances, artwork, jewelry, and antiques.

Where To Go

If you have yet to decide where, exactly, you plan to relocate, now’s the time to put your finger on the map. When you’re looking for a new city, look ahead to the job market. Are there plenty of opportunities in your industry? While this won’t make a huge difference if you work from home, it’s huge if you’re a musician, work in the travel and hospitality industry, or have another job that relies on public interaction. When affordability is your number one priority, particularly if you have children, look for family-friendly communities. Chesapeake, Virginia; Seattle, Washington; and Omaha, Nebraska are among the most affordable places for families to live.

Moving is an intimidating endeavor, and it’s made even more so when you’re moving because of a loss.  But, remember, it is not that you are running away from the death of your loved one, but that you must continue to live. In doing so, you have to make decisions that work for your life now. If staying in your current home isn’t emotionally healthy or financially affordable, moving may be the best choice.

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